Mill Park Publishing of Eagle, Idaho was created in 2003 by author Elaine Ambrose.
The company facilitates fee-based book publication and marketing for local authors
and organizes writer's retreats.

Wednesday, 27 April 2011 04:13

Skipping Around the Writer's Block

Written by  Elaine Ambrose

I recently saw the movie Limitless.

(Side note #1: I went to various online sites to learn how to punctuate movie titles and found several different answers that instructed to use italics, or underline, or capitalize, or use quotations, so I reached for The Chicago Manual of Style and it stated to use italics, so that’s what I did.  Professor Burt Cross would be so proud.)

But, I digress. The movie was about a loser writer named Eddie Morra, played by actor Bradley Cooper.

(Side note #2: You have to forget about the hilarious part he played in “Hangover” because this is an action thriller with no tigers, babies or tighty whities.)

Anyway, poor Eddie is suffering from writer’s block, but he’s under deadline to finish his novel. He sits at his laptop and nothing happens. (Been there, done that.) Then he runs into an ex-brother-in-law who gives him the magic smart pill that sets his brain on fire. (Never been there nor done that.) Eureka! In just a few days he writes an amazing novel and triumphantly drops the finished manuscript on his publisher's desk.

(Side note #3: I emailed the manuscript for Menopause Sucks one chapter at a time, so I didn’t get to march in and dramatically deliver the finished work.)

Suddenly Eddie knows everything and can do everything, thanks to the wonders of pharmaceutical enhancements. Success and mayhem ensue, and his talent and potential are, indeed, without limits.

As a writer, you probably have experienced both ends of the writing spectrum – a frustrating dry spell that makes you wonder how you dare call yourself a writer – or a sudden, uncontrollable creative urge so intense that your fingers can’t keep up with your brain. That’s all part of the gig, and it’s why writing is so unpredictable, maddening and magical. It’s just you and your brain, and that can be an amazing combination.

(Side note #4: Though I don’t advocate taking drugs to improve your writing skills, it never hurts to coax the creative juices with a glass of wine and/or plate of warm cookies. Add some interpretive music and then watch those brilliant words leap to the page and energetically scramble into intriguing sentences. Limitless, of course.)

Last modified on Wednesday, 27 April 2011 04:31

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